The Road Not Taken poetry

THE ROAD NOT TAKEN

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;


Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,



And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.



I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.



STANZA 1

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;
____________________________________________________
Poet is describing a fork in the road.
This poem was first published in 1916, when cars were only just beginning to become
prominent, so these roads in the wood are probably more like paths, not roads like
we'd think of them today.
The woods are yellow, which means that it's probably fall and the leaves are turning
colours.
"Diverged" is just another word for split. There's a fork in the road.



STANZA 2

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,
_____________________________________________________________
So after all this buildup about one road, which he's looked down for a long time, poet takes the other
path.
The poet still seems pretty uncertain when he explains that this second path is better. It is only
"perhaps" better.
Then the poet tells us why the path is better – it seems like it hasn't been walked on very much,
because it's grassy and doesn't look worn


STANZA 3

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.
__________________________________________________________
Here, again, we hear that the paths are equal, but we find out something new, that it's morning. It's
possible that our poet is the first to travel to this place on that day.
The poet seems like he's already regretting his decision. He is rationalizing his choice of path by saying
he'll come back to the one he missed later.
The speaker realizes that his hopes to come back and try the other path may be foolish.
Trodden – trampled, crushed



STANZA 4

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.
________________________________________________________
In this line, the speaker sums up his story and tells us that he took the road less traveled by. With the
hesitation in the line before, this declaration could be triumphant – or regretful.
Sigh - breathe out, exhale


                  By Robert Frost

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